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The Chess Clock

chess clock

Showing a 5+0 setup, 5 minutes main time with zero increment

At the end of this stupid year, ravaged by GovId-19 too, not just by covid-19, I put together a chess clock. Even though the number of people I can play with physically is really limited — obviously not everyone thinks, like me, that a calculated risk is worth a decent amount of freedom, poor old BF with who does or does not deserve what exactly — I just wanted to put together the clock, cause why not. Although it is a microsoft site, I published the project on github.

One thing a friend of mine noted: the lunch box… I find it one of the greatest challenges about home made gadgets to find the right box for them, without the 3d printer black magic. I also wanted this one to be transparent.

Another thing, more of a philosophical nature: the more I play around with arduinos, the more I realize how much effort went into the whole thing to be easy like a toy, instead of the PITA it could have been, to enable one to really create on top of an abstraction layer, in contrast with such mindfucks as that of  manually calculating the value of a register to attain a baudrate on some obscure microcontroller I ran into at work, because libraries, because bootstrapping, and because it’s the business logic we are focused on, not reinventing the wheels of bit counting. Really, it’s almost 2021.

(tovább…)

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Jupiter 3D – 2020-09-10

This is a cross-eye 3D rendition of the data captured on 2020-09-10 at around 19:07Z, both frames a stack of 90 seconds, with only two seconds apart. HEQ5, N250/1200, TSO ADC, automated filter wheel, Baader IR-pass 650 filter, ASI 462MC (cooled), home observatory, mountpusher The frames are arranged so that Io does indeed look to be closer to the viewer.

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Io, Callisto 2020-09-21

HEQ5, N250/1200, TSO ADC, automated filter wheel, ASI 462MC (cooled), home observatory, mountpusher

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Jupiter and Ganymede 2020-09-19

HEQ5, N250/1200, TSO ADC, automated filter wheel, ASI 462MC (cooled), home observatory, mountpusher

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Jupiter 2020-09-06

HEQ5, N250/1200, TSO ADC, ASI 462MC (cooled), IR-pass 650,  home observatory, mountpusher

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Moon: Philolaus 2020-08-29

HEQ5, N250/1200, TSO ADC, ASI 462MC (cooled), home observatory, mountpusher

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Jupiter and Callisto on 2020-09-05

Jupiter, Callisto, and Ganymede’s shadow are featured. HEQ5, N250/1200, TSO ADC, filters, ASI 462MC (cooled), home observatory, mountpusher

IR-pass 650

Callisto, Jupiter, Ganymede’s shadow and Ganymede. UV/IR cut filter

(tovább…)

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Estimating the length of planetary videos

There’s a legend among amateur astronomers that, without derotation, Jupiter supports only 90 seconds of raw video. Anything above it: derotate.

It always felt fishy to me, even before I started doing planetary photography. Due to other reasons, like capturing the moons’ movement, and the interplay of shadows, I always tried to keep the videos short.

However, the subject is evergreen wherever there are newcomers. So, now I made the math, and since we are people, not mathboys, here’s a handy little table one can play with or scroll below, the same calculator loads into this article.

(tovább…)

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Jupiter, Ganymede, Io 2020-08-29

HEQ5, N250/1200, TSO ADC, ASI 462MC (cooled), home observatory, mountpusher

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Jupiter with a diagonal line — 2020-08-20

Yesterday was like any other day, using the little time I have left with this part of the sky — long live the real estate maffia. So I turned on the telescope to record Jupiter. At first, I thought the feature is a piece of hair or something similar, but it moves together with Jupiter, so it should be on Jupiter — or a really extreme case of an artifact from the workflow. I’ve never seen something this big on Jupiter. HEQ5, N250/1200, TSO ADC, ASI 224MC (cooled), home observatory, mountpusher

Hypotheses:

1. a random alignment of features. Could be proved by feature tracking, but I have no data for the last seven days. It’s been raining.

2. scars from an impact event, a row of meteors hit Jupiter some time before my session.

3. ?

In the meanwhile, I received notice from two independent observers that the feature is visible on their pictures too: https://www.asztrofoto.hu/galeria_image/1598019963 and https://www.asztrofoto.hu/galeria_image/1598020097

 

Jupiter, 5 minutes derotated, showing the same feature, 1933Z

(tovább…)

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Jól kalibrált monitoron mindegyik számnál elkülönülő árnyalat látszik. Ha mégsem látszanak, akkor a megjelenített képek színhiányosan rajzolódnak ki. A monitort valószínűleg kalibrálni kell.

You should see distinct shades for each number. If those shades are not clearly visible, the displayed pictures will lack accuracy. Your display most likely needs to be calibrated (brightness, gamma, contrast etc.).